Recovery

recoveryWhen we do not face our insecurities, we remain mired in the unconscious, unmet needs of our childhood. We often project those needs onto the people closest to us. Spouses are perfectly set up for this, as are friends, co-workers and family. We can use anybody who is close to us to keep the focus away from our deep inner selves and focus on the unacceptable behaviors of others instead.

Anytime we are not present to ourselves, our feelings and our connection with something bigger than ourselves, we are in danger of turning to addictions. Food or coffee, gambling, drugs or alcohol, work or success, love and relationships become powerful distractions.

Co-dependency is the state of needing something or somebody outside ourselves to feel and be OK. What’s missing is 100% acceptance of our own responsibility as an adult to soothe and look after ourselves. This does not mean we never turn to others for support or guidance. But instead of expecting someone else to make us feel better, our focus shifts slightly and profoundly: please help me to help myself.

Responsible adulthood means accepting that loved ones and friends can not always “be there for us.”

Jayne provides opportunities to:

  • strengthen sense of self
  • develop ways of soothing from within
  • develop emotional maturity

Get in touch with Jayne using the form below:

What Clients Say:

  • If you would like to follow up with more information about affairs please read Esther Perel's new book. Some of her ideas are included in ...

    The State of Affairs – Rethinking Infidelity

  • Some questions to consider .
  • To keep yourself in the sexual moment, put words to your desires, your longings to be touched, licked, fondled, stroked, caressed as they occur. Notice ...

    Keep your eyes open and your words flowing
  • This is a compliment to you. I hear your voice telling me that I don’t need to suffer anymore.

    Client, Sidney, BC